What happens when genAI meets low code?

GenAI is all the rage today, but not long ago, low-code and no-code development had a moment. If developers combine these technologies, can they make programming more efficient?

When the programming language Cobol was invented in 1959, the US Department of Defense was trying to make code simpler. The Common Business-Oriented Language, like its immediate predecessor Flow-Matic, used English language prose to make the code more accessible for everyday users.  

Nearly 70 years later, every subsequent advancement in code has sought the same end: Make code simpler. 

In an industry full of hype cycles, generative AI, large language models (LLMs), and copilots are currently in

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