Four More Asset Managers Join Plato Partnership

AXA Investment Managers, Union Investment, JPMorgan Asset Management and Fidelity Worldwide Investment Sign Up.

City of London
London-based Plato Partnership includes both buy and sell side firms aiming to lower trading costs.

The four firms join other organizations from both the buy and sell side, including UBS, Barclays, Goldman Sachs, Citi and Deutsche Bank. The trading platform is aimed at lowering trading costs, improving data quality and improving trade execution.

Revenues that are generated through the trading utility will be used to commission research through the partnership's Market Structure Innovation Center.

"Plato Partnership has a compelling proposition and I am looking forward to helping them refine the market model," says Kristian West, global head of equity trading at JPMorgan Asset Management. "The intention is to offer lower frictional costs for our funds, which would support our core objective of best execution and improved returns for our clients."

"Our vision is growing rapidly and we are designed to allow uncompromised focus on improving market quality and removing frictional costs," says Stephen McGoldrick, project director for Plato Partnership. "We look forward to widening our membership and setting a new benchmark in execution quality, trust and transparency."

Only users who have a paid subscription or are part of a corporate subscription are able to print or copy content.

To access these options, along with all other subscription benefits, please contact info@waterstechnology.com or view our subscription options here: http://subscriptions.waterstechnology.com/subscribe

You are currently unable to copy this content. Please contact info@waterstechnology.com to find out more.

Systematic tools gain favor in fixed income

Automation is enabling systematic strategies in fixed income that were previously reserved for equities trading. The tech gap between the two may be closing, but differences remain.

Why recent failures are a catalyst for DLT’s success

Deutsche Bank’s Mathew Kathayanat and Jie Yi Lee argue that DLT's high-profile failures don't mean the technology is dead. Now that the hype has died down, the path is cleared for more measured decisions about DLT’s applications.

You need to sign in to use this feature. If you don’t have a WatersTechnology account, please register for a trial.

Sign in
You are currently on corporate access.

To use this feature you will need an individual account. If you have one already please sign in.

Sign in.

Alternatively you can request an individual account here